Author Archives: Hanneke van Eijken

Hanneke van Eijken

About Hanneke van Eijken

Hanneke van Eijken is assistant professor in EU law and postdoc researcher in the multidiscplinary research project bEUcitizen. Hanneke completed her Master’s programme in European Law at Utrecht University, with an honourable mention, in 2007. She worked at Pels Rijcken & Droogleever Fortuijn as a support lawyer in the European law division. Hanneke conducted a PhD thesis, in which she analysed the role of EU citizenship in the process of the constitutionalisation of the European Union, under the supervision of Professor and judge of the CJEU Sacha Prechal. During her research she made several research visits to the Court of Justice in Luxembourg and stayed at the European University Institute in Florence as a visiting researcher. Her research fields are EU citizenship, constitutional EU law, fundamental rights protection, free movement rights, democracy and political participation and judicial review.

EU citizenship: a slipping anchor to hold on to rights? Brexit and the consequences for EU citizens with British nationality

This summer many European citizens woke up in shock. Whilst reading the newspaper, listening to the radio, scrolling on Facebook, having breakfast, we learnt that a small majority of the voters in the Brexit referendum voted to leave the European Union. Not only does the (potential) Brexit have consequences for the internal market and the economic and social rights of EU citizens, but it also threatens their status as such. This is shocking for EU citizens with the nationality of another Member State residing in the United Kingdom, because their status will be redefined. For instance, in the future they will no longer be able to rely on equal treatment based on EU citizenship in the United Kingdom. Possibly even more shocked were British nationals, who might now actually lose their status as EU citizens, either living in the United Kingdom or elsewhere in the European Union. This will significantly impact their possibilities to work, study, and take up residence in another EU Member State. Continue reading